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How Can Physical Therapy Help Bone Fracture?

How Can Physical Therapy Help Bone Fracture?

The type of therapy will, of course, differ based on the type of fracture. But in general, therapy begins when the cast is removed. Strengthening and aggressive range of motion exercises usually must wait until the bone has healed. The physical therapist:

  • Assesses the fracture to make sure the patient can return safely to previous home and work activities.
  • Works with the patient to regain fitness.
  • Helps the patient gain full movement and strength in a safe manner while healing is happening.
  • Guides the patient to a safe return to sports and other physical activities—a return too early after a fracture may increase the risk of another fracture.

Rist And Elbow Fractures

The type of therapy will be based on the type of fracture. Therapy begins when cast is removed Strengthening and aggressive range of motion exercises usually wait until the bone has healed. The physical therapist helps:

  • Assess the fracture to make sure the patient can return safely to previous home and work activities.
  • Works with the patient to regain fitness.
  • Helps the patient restore full movement and strength in a safe manner while healing occurs.
  • Guides the patient to a safe return to sports and other physical activities but if you start too early you may be at high risk to fracture your bone again.

Ankle fractures

Physical therapy is very important after an ankle fracture. It will often include activities to increase movement at the ankle and other joints during or after the period of immobilization. The physical therapist attends to pain relief and help a patient learn to walk safely using crutches or a walker. Eventually, a patient will begin strengthening exercises. It could take several months for the muscles around the ankle to grow strong enough to allow walking without a limp and a return to regular activities. Later, the physical therapist adds activities to include building of the muscles around the knee, the hip, ankle, and lower trunk so the patient is fully prepared to return to normal activity.

 

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